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Fine George III Longcase Clock by James Howden of Edinburgh c. 1775

Item has been reserved Fine George III Longcase Clock by James Howden of Edinburgh c. 1775

Fine George III Longcase Clock by James Howden of Edinburgh c. 1775

SHORT DESCRIPTION
A particulary fine example of an Edinburgh mahogany Longcase clock by James Howden.
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DIMENSIONS
The clock is 89.5 inches high including the finials.
DATED
c.1775
PRICE
Price on Application

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Item Name Fine George III Longcase Clock by James Howden of Edinburgh c. 1775
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FULL DESCRIPTION
A particularly fine example of an Edinburgh mahogany Longcase clock by James Howden.

An important Edinburgh clock making dynasty, the Howden family are recorded over three generations from circa 1775.

James Howden, who made this clock, served his apprenticeship under the master Scottish clockmakers Alexander Farquharson and James Cowan from 1764 to 1771. James was released from his apprenticeship and made a member of the Clockmakers Company in 1774. He died in January 1810. There was no better known business of high repute in Edinburgh at this time than Howdens and at the time of James retirement in 1808 the following notice appeared:

James Howden, 3 Hunter Square, Edinburgh, in returning his warmest thanks to the numerous class of friends and customers who have so steadily patronised him in business for a long series of years, begs leave to intimate to them and the public that he retired from business in December last, and that the shop occupied by him since that time has been possessed by his sons James and William Howden, the former as watchmaker, the latter as jeweller and silversmith. They have been bred to their several professions under the first masters in London, and being fully confident of their strictest attention and assiduity he presumes to solicit on their behalf a continuation of that patronage with which he has so liberally been favoured. Edinburgh Evening Courant, 22nd April 1809 (ref Old Scottish Clockmakers - see below).

Keeping excellent time and chiming perfectly on the hour, with working date aperture. The clock is in superb original and fully working condition and has been checked and carefully serviced. The mechanism is fully guaranteed for two years by Mr Malcolm Styles (renowned clock maker and restorer in Tunbridge Wells).

The 8-Day movement has rack striking of the hours on a bell and its original anchor escapement with steel pendulum rod and brass faced bob, and with original weights.

The arched brass dial with silvered chapter ring and seconds ring, the roman numerals still filled with their original black wax. With brass etched engraved centre with foliate rococo spandrels of flowers, vines and leaves to the corners and well pierced hour, minute and second original steel hands. The aperture for the date is above the VI and to the arch is a finely signed brass plaque with hand engraved border, flanked by further fine fettled brass spandrels of open flowers, leaves and vines.

The elegant case has an arched pediment with a central ball & spire brass finials which are later replacements. The hood door and hood columns all finely strung with satinwood and ebony, the stringing repeated to the long trunk door and flanking columns which terminate in beautiful pale satinwood panels each finely strung in satinwood and ebony. The case is veneered in figured and flamed mahogany of very good colour and patina.

An exceptional long case clock of exemplary craftsmanship. James Howden would have made the entire mechanism by hand himself, designing and casting each brass element and sitting for hours by candlelight with tiny files, to finish each cog and wheel and fettle each spandrel. The case is original to the clock - cases were made by cabinet makers who were employed by the clock maker and each case was made bespoke and tailored to the clock mechanism.

The elegant case has an arched pediment with a central ball & spire brass finials which are later replacements. The hood door and hood columns all finely strung with satinwood and ebony, the stringing repeated to the long trunk door and flanking columns which terminate in beautiful pale satinwood panels each finely strung in satinwood and ebony. The case is veneered in figured and flamed mahogany of very good colour and patina.

An exceptional long case clock of exemplary craftsmanship. James Howden would have made the entire mechanism by hand himself, designing and casting each brass element and sitting for hours by candlelight with tiny files, to finish each cog and wheel and fettle each spandrel. The case is original to the clock, the cases were made by cabinet makers who were employed by the clock maker and each case was made bespoke to suit the clock mechanism.

The long slow tick and soft chimes to each hour transport you to 1775, and straight into James Howdens workshop in Hunter Square.

The clock is 89.5 inches high including the finials.

from: Old Scottish Clockmakers from 1453 to 1850 by John Smith, complied from old sources with notes and published in 1921 by Oliver and Boyd, Tweeddale Court, 33 Paternoster Row, London.

Many more details about James Howden and his clocks are included in this illustrated book.